Ordinary Postage Stamps – Issue of 1890

One-cent. — Profile bust, after Ceracchi, of Benjamin Franklin, looking to the left, on an ellipse, with a dark background and narrow white border, immediately above which, set in a panel conforming to the elliptical curve, are the words “United States postage” in white capitals, and below which, in slightly larger and shaded letters, arranged in a waved line running nearly the whole width of the stamp, are the words “One cent.” Just above these latter words, on either side, is a white numeral of denomination — the Arabic figure “1” — in a small oval space, surrounded by an ornate scroll, the upper portion of which is connected with and serves as a support to the panel around the medallion. The whole is placed upon a distinctly lined oblong tablet, seven-eighths of an inch high by three-fourths of an inch wide, with beveled sides and bottom. The color is blue. The medallions on all these series are elliptical.

Two-cent. — Profile bust, after Houdon, of George Washington, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as in the 1-cent stamp, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, carmine. Improved quality of color for the 2-cent stamp was adopted on May 12, 1890.

Three-cent. — Profile bust after Powers, of Andrew Jackson, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as in the 1-cent stamp, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, purple.

Ordinary Postage Stamps - Issue of 1890

Four-cent. — Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, after a photograph from life, three-quarters face, looking to the right. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as in the 1-cent stamp, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, dark brown. Issued June 2,
1890.

Five-cent. — Portrait of U. S. Grant, after a photograph from life, three-quarters face, looking to the right. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as in the 1-cent stamp, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, light brown. Issued June 2, 1890.

Six-cent. — Portrait of James A. Garfield, after a photograph from life, three-quarters face, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as on the 1-cent stamp, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, light maroon.

Ordinary Postage Stamps - Issue of 1890 - denomination, issue date and color

Note. – The 8-cent stamp was not issued until Mar. 21, 1893, in connection with the reduction of the registry fee from 10 to 8 cents.

Eight-cent.— Portrait of Gen. William T. Sherman, after a photograph from life, full face. The surroundings of the picture are the same as those on the stamps below the 10-cent denomination, with the necessary change of figures and letters representing the value. Color, lilac. It was issued March 21. 1893, in connection with the reduction of the registry fee from 10 to 8 cents.

Ten-cent. — Portrait of Daniel Webster, after a daguerreotype from life, three-quarters face, looking to the left, with the dark background and narrow white border, around the upper half of which, set in a panel conforming to the medallion curve, are the words “United States postage” in small white capitals, the words “Ten cents” in somewhat similar letters being placed in a like panel below the medallion. Below this again, in the two lower corners of the stamp, are plain Arabic numerals of denominations, “10”, set in circular spaces surrounded with ornate scrolls, not unlike those in the 1-cent stamp. The whole is placed upon an oblong tablet, 7/8 of an inch high by 3/4 of an inch wide, with beveled sides and bottom. The color is green.

Fifteen-cent. — Portrait of Henry Clay, after a daguerreotype from life, three-quarters face, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are substantially the same as in the 10-cent stamp, with appropriate changes of figures and letters representing the denomination. Color, deep blue.

Thirty-cent. — Profile bust of Thomas Jefferson, after Ceracchi, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are the same as in the 10-cent stamp, with the necessary change of the letters and figures of denomination, the latter, however, being of block form. Color, black.

Ninety-cent. — Profile bust of Commodore O. H. Perry, after Wolcott’s statue, looking to the left. The surroundings of the medallion are substantially the same as in the 30-cent stamp, with the necessary change of the letters and figures of the denomination. Color, orange.

The dimensions of all the above stamps are three-fourths by seven-eighths of an inch.

Published by John Jr. Paperly