“The worship of the holy trinity,” Albrecht Dührer – overview of the painting

“The worship of the holy trinity,” Albrecht Dührer – overview of the painting
“The worship of the holy trinity,” Albrecht Dührer - overview of the painting - 1

  • Posted by Albrecht Durer
  • Museum: Museum of the History of the Arts, Vienna
  • Year: 1511

Overview of the painting :

The worship of the holy trinity is Albrecht Dührer. Board, oil. 135 x 123 cm
   In 1511, Albrecht Dührer created his most sublime-spiritual work – “The Worship of the Holy Trinity”. Despite the fact that there are extremely few paintings with a religious plot in Dürer’s work, the existence of this altar image pays for their small numbers.

   This work is the order of the merchant Matthias Landauer for the chapel of All Saints in a shelter called “12 Brothers.”. This shelter was created by Matthias himself for 12 old artisans, who were supposed, including, to pray for him daily in return for receiving shelter and food.

   This altar image shows the artist’s view of the events after the Last Judgment. The plot is religiously classic, it presents :

  • God the father, supporting the crucifixion with Jesus Christ
  • holy spirit floating over them in the image of a dove
  • Virgin Mary
  • John the Baptist

   In addition to the saints, Albrecht Durer added earthly people to the composition. So, for example, an old man in a dark cloak and with his kneel (lower corner) is Matthias Landauer, and a lonely man in the lower right corner is the artist himself, holding a map with a Latin inscription: “Albrecht Durer from Nuremberg created this in 1511 after the birth of the Virgin. “.

   It is also interesting that in the plot of the picture you can see the laity. Their presence brings significant meaning to the work: both knights, monks, and soldiers are equally beloved children of God, equal before the Holy Trinity. Thus, Dührer wanted to portray the onset of the kingdom of God on Earth – a new century after the Last Judgment, a century of love and equality of people.

   The picture is one of the most epoch-making altar images of the 16th century.